Abuse of Elderly American Father and HIs Special Needs American Son in Cochabamba, Bolivia, by Dr. Robert Foster Edinger

My name is Dr. Robert Foster Edinger and I am the father of David Dylan Edinger who has dual citizenship Bolivian/American; we both live in Cochabamba, Bolivia. I am a victim of abuse by the the Bolivian justice system. The principal problem that I have, is that while I have been ordered by law to deposit 1500 bolivianos a month, which I have faithfully done for years now, I have no legal right to see my son because the Justice System refuses to give me either a hearing or an explanation. I will be 63 years old this coming November of 2020, and I still have no visitation rights with my only family.

This represents both elder abuse and child abuse, since David is denied a legal right to have a relation with his father, to which he is entitled under Bolivian law, and it constitutes elder abuse since I also have a right to see and spend time with my only child and the only family that I have left. The failure of the Bolivian justice system to respond to my petitions constitutes, as I see it, their complicity in the extortion, child abuse, and elder abuse to which my son and I are subjected.

We are the only Edingers in Bolivia. My second attorney (link above) through these processes, like the first one, has subjected me to what is best described as theft of services, since she did not render the services that she promised in exchange for the fee agreed upon. 

 

My health is poor and I cannot afford medical care. I am in need of life-saving surgery that I do not have the money to pay for because of the extortion to which I have been subjected.  I am making all of this public in an attempt to motivate the Bolivian justice system to investigate the case of David and I, especially since we are both US citizens, born in the USA both of us. Please, I beg you for help, please write to the Bolivian embassy and the ambassador of Bolivia in Washington, DC and ask him/her to help Robert and David Edinger, since no one is interested in helping us in Bolivia. It is my hope that this web site will progress to the point that it comes to the attention of the Bolivian authorities in Washington, DC, and one of them realizes that this publicity is not good for tourism.

 

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Child and Elder Abuse of Americans in Bolivia, Extortion | Protest Blog 2020

A plea for help from an old man and his 8-year-old son from the United States, trapped in Bolivia and subject to extortion and extreme cruelty.

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      Robert Edinger I have no legal right to see my son because his Bolivian mother was given full custody. The justice system does not respond to my numerous petitions for a hearing or audencia for either custody or visitation. They have ordered me to pay 1500 bs in child support with no legal right to see him, my only child and only family. I am protesting.

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    Danuta Stawarz So sad to hear about your situation. I heard of this happening before, also in Cochabamba. Some women unfortunately treat children of foreign and older fathers as a money bait. I wish you all the best!

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      Robert Edinger Thanks for your support Danuta. I am going to be working hard on this web site. I hope to get it within the top three results on google for a search for Embassy of Bolivia USA, embarrass them a little, can't think of much else to do. Of course, Evo wou…

    • Carissa Munn Unfortunately, this does not only happen to foreigners here, it happens to all fathers here. They have virtually no rights regardless if they are the more fit parent. They are merely a paycheck and the court system with make sure of that. I'm sorry you are going through this, I think it is appalling and such a disservice to the child not growing up with their father in their life.

  • Sara Paulina Jauregui I'm so sorry this happened to you. It disgust me every time I hear foreigners are being taking advantage of in cases like yours *with * the complicity of the judicial system. I will share your case, and hope you get some solution. I apologize as a Bolivian, I'm sorry.

  • Milan Sime Martinić Have you spoken with Defensoria de la Ninez?

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      Robert Edinger I just posted this same post on the facebook page of the Cochabamba office of the defensoria. Maybe they will write to me, or say something.

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    Danny Ashman Some people pay judges a fee to help see justice happen. Another option is talking with a lawyer and paying extra to assure that Bolivia's government child protection agency files official reports documenting her abuse of your child which would give you a legal basis for getting custody. It may also be possible to bribe her with a lump sum to get partial or full custody

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      Danny Ashman Okay so I read through your whole post now. Bolivian law heavily favors the mom so the courts and lawyers may really just be enforcing the law right now. So as far as raising awareness of a general problem, your efforts may be helpful.

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    Susana Zambrana Sorry to hear about this! I honestly don't think it only happens to foreigners, I have a few acquaintances who pay their child support religiously and still have no visitation rights. Courts are biased towards the mother 99% of the time.

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    Michelle Olvera Fatherhood rights are problematic globally. Sending virtual moral support....please keep us posted. Robert Edinger I would suggest you also Tweet the shit out of this with a twitter account and use #Bolivia hashtag #FatherhoodRights

I want to thank everyone for their comments on this thread, which I have published on my web site Protest2020.com. This web site is part of my son's inheritance and, hopefully, someday, when he is an adult, he will read your comments and be transported back to the time when he was 8 years old, and see how his father struggled to spend time with him. Our group is wonderful, thanks to the founders and admins. Never has such a diverse group of people from so many different places and walks of life showed more solidarity among members. It is lovely.

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Protest2020! 2020 is the year of protest, ushered in on the heels of 2019, which saw numerous social explosions in the last few months of the year. Climate change, in particular, is feeding a well-founded sense of fear, particularly among the vulnerable and their activist allies whose lives and futures are highly precarious. In fact, all of us are vulnerable, and awareness is growing of the way in which we are all in this together. While in most places, most notably Hong Kong, protests have turned violent and thousands of arrests have been made, there have not yet been large numbers of fatalities, although dozens of protestors have died and continue to die in South America. In other parts of the world, most notably the Middle East – home to warfare for decades – particularly in Iraq and its neighbor and former enemy Iran, hundreds of protestors have been killed with live, military-grade ammunition. After 5 years of civil war in Syria, protest has given way to military action hand in hand with death and destruction. The numbers of people murdered by the governments of the region are not fully known, and especially hard to verify in Iran, where a brutal religious dictatorship maintains a thick cloak of secrecy over such information.

Iran and its allies in Iraq are now moving precipitously towards war with the United States, in part because the mentally ill president of that country needs to wage war in order to win reelection. Large parts of the world that are the most vulnerable to the ravages of climate change are already suffering; places like the Philippines are experiencing devastating and lethal storms, one after the other, breaking all historical records.

Much of Australia has been on fire for months as we ring in 2020, accompanied by the hottest temperatures on record. This is changing Australian lives, politics, and the consciousness of the ordinary Australian who is now getting involved in the struggle to save their island, and coming to a better understanding of how their survival is linked to the rest of the world. In Japan, forces are growing in protest to push the Japanese government towards support for the Hong Kong protestors, confronting mainland China; also supporting the struggles of minority groups in mainland China, reporting on government abuses, etc. The US government has expressed its full support for the Hong Kong protestors, further escalating tensions between these two superpowers along with ally Russia. These tensions were already at their most aggravated moments as a result of the US/China trade war.

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To make matters still worse, especially for SE Asia, the North Korean dictator is threatening the use of a new strategic weapon. Our world on the arrival of 2020 is a tinderbox as never before. The 2020 presidential elections in the USA will be the single greatest determining factor for the survival of the planet. Given that the current president preaches a doctrine of conflict and confrontation rather than collaboration, and denies that climate change is even exacerbated by man-made actions, if he is re-elected, there will be little hope for our world in the short term.

Here at Protest2020.com, we invite you to protest, share your views, and help us all to march towards a more sustainable and peaceful world that will not totally implode, at least within our lifetimes, leaving hope for life to continue in more intelligent forms, better appreciating our planetary home. We ultimately seek harmony with nature so as to preserve life as we know it, as we dream it could be. Everything depends on how hard we are willing to fight to make it so.

 

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